Coming Soon: A New Book for Interfaith Families

Frozen Pine Needles
Photo by Susan Katz Miller

 

It has been a freezing winter, with everything cased in ice, still waiting for a thaw. Meanwhile, my longtime followers may have noticed that my blog has been in hibernation. After almost a decade of posting, and more than 300 essays on the topic of interfaith families, I have been sluggish in writing new material here. Instead, I curled up in my den, trying to keep warm through seasons of family grief, and dark times for the country, and the planet.

But now spring is on the way. And, while hibernating, I have been gestating a new book for interfaith families. Now that I have submitted the manuscript, and the sun is returning, and grief is receding, I will return to posting more often here. In the meantime, you can always find my curated links for interfaith families on my facebook author page, and on twitter.

The percentage of interfaith families continues to grow, and there is still a serious lack of informed and impartial books and resources by, for, and about us. Before 2018 ends, if all goes according to plan, my new book will reach you, providing support and inspiration for all interfaith families, whether Protestant and atheist, Muslim and Jewish, Hindu and Unitarian-Universalist, Pagan and Catholic. And I am already booking a new round of speaking engagements and workshops for next fall and winter, so that we can continue these conversations in person. So, stay in touch here for more details, as we awake, stretch, and stumble out into the spring light together.

 

Journalist Susan Katz Miller is a speaker and consultant on interfaith families, interfaith education, and interfaith peacemaking. Her book Being Both: Embracing Two Religions in One Interfaith Family is available from Beacon Press.

Advertisements

Generation Interfaith: Harrisburg, Chicago, Long Island

IMG_1903
The Jewish Museum, NYC

 

Is this truly year three of the Being Both book tour? Somehow, I am still traveling around the country, speaking at museums, universities, conferences, synagogues, and churches. I continue to draw new energy and ideas from my conversations with all of you at these events. And, I am even more passionate now than I was three years ago about listening to your stories, and exploring the experiences of interfaith families in our culture and our world.

If the time seemed right for Being Both three years ago, it seems all the more important now, as we face religious and racial intolerance and strive for social justice. I find my message is evolving in response to my encounters with all of you, in person and online. Here are just some of the advocacy themes that I feel compelled to tackle as an interfaith activist:

  1. Religious institutions need to accept that a significant percentage of interfaith families want their children to have interfaith education. Engaging with these families makes more sense than excluding them.
  2. Religious institutions need to move beyond tolerating or even welcoming interfaith families, and figure out how to benefit from interfaith families.
  3. Organizations devoted to interfaith dialogue and understanding need to recognize the important role of people from interfaith families as bridge-builders and peacemakers, rather than feeling threatened by perceived blurring of boundaries.
  4. It is time to celebrate the rise of Generation Interfaith. Our world is being transformed by adult interfaith children who are now rabbis, ministers, priests, teachers, and organizational and political leaders.
  5. In a time of continuing religious tension and strife, we all need more interfaith education. And interfaith children, in particular, need and deserve interfaith education.

Recently, you all have helped me develop these ideas, on facebook and twitter, in our Network of Interfaith Family Groups, in New York at The Jewish Museum in an “Unorthodox” presentation with Jewish historian Alan Levenson, in the private coaching work I do with interfaith couples, and in the consulting I do with religious educators, clergy, and organizations. In the last few months, I have been able to expand on some of these ideas in “Is There a Jewish Way to Parent?” in Moment Magazine,  in “4 Questions Every Interfaith Couple Should Ask Before Getting Serious,” in the Huffington Post, and in an extended local CBS news interview (in three parts, scroll to the bottom of that page).

IMG_1904
The Jewish Museum, NYC

 

Coming up in March, I am excited about continuing these conversations in Harrisburg PA, Chicago, and Long Island. If you have friends or family in these places, let them know about these upcoming events:

Harrisburg PA, March 3 2016, 6-7:30pm. Interfaith Families (and book signing), Morrison Gallery, Library, Penn State Harrisburg. Free.

Highland Park IL, March 6 2016, 10:30-noon. Lakeside Congregation for Reform Judaism. Free. Come at 10:15 for breakfast!

Chicago IL, March 6 2016, 7-9pm. Mishkan Chicago (registration is full, sign up for waitlist), at Uncommon Ground (Lakeview). Free coffee and dessert bar . Co-Sponsored by InterfaithFamily/Chicago.

Chicago IL, March 7 2016. Generation Interfaith: Women as Religious Innovators, Illinois Institute of Technology. Free.

Brookville LI, NY, March 20 2016, 11:15-noon. “Generation InterfaithInterfaith Community of Long Island, Brookville Multifaith Campus. Free.

You can always check the most updated details on all of the upcoming Being Both events at susankatzmiller.com/events. And let me know if we can work together to set up a talk, workshop, or consultation in your area. I am not going to move on and write a book about a completely different topic. Interfaith life is my life’s work.

 

Susan Katz Miller’s book, Being Both: Embracing Two Religions in One Interfaith Family is available now in hardcover, paperback and eBook from Beacon Press.